professor

"My pledges as a reviewer"

CUHK Professor Yufei Tao’s homepage has this interesting tidbit:

My pledges as a reviewer:

  • I will treat your work with respect.
  • I will spend enough time with your paper. I will not make any decision without a good understanding.
  • In case I decide to recommend rejection, I will do so on solid grounds. I do not reject papers based on subjective and vacuous statements such as “I don’t like this idea”.
  • I will write reviews in a courteous manner. I have seen harsh reviews by other people which heavily mention my publications, and thus make people feel I was the reviewer. I will never do anything like this.
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biggest drawing in the world

via Core77:

Erik Nordenankar uses a GPS tracker and an extremely detailed set of delivery instructions to enlist DHL help in sketching his mug across the surface of planet earth.

Link to official website carrying detailed videos and other cool stuff.

update: Professor Nate Clark writes in to point out that this is a hoax.

Recursive Food

From Everything2:

A CS professor once explained recursion as follows

A child couldn’t sleep, so her mother told her a story about a little frog,
who couldn’t sleep, so the frog’s mother told her a story about a little bear,
who couldn’t sleep, so the bear’s mother told her a story about a little weasel…
who fell asleep.
…and the little bear fell asleep;
…and the little frog fell asleep;
…and the child fell asleep.

It goes on to explain fractals as:

A mathematical figure that is self-similar; that is, as you zoom into it, you will see the same pattern repeated over and over again.

I should point out to all my non-geeky readers that recursions and fractals are an important part of computer science culture. We used to sign up for programming competitions in high school / undergrad as Recursive Nightmare(where a guy has a dream in a dream in a dream in a dream… stack overflow, head explodes!), and I’ve seen text books where the index contains jokes like “Recursion……. see recursion”.

Obviously, such intriguing contexts have to be applied outside computer science, and what better place to try this out than the wonderful world of food? Here’s presenting the wild world of recursive food!

We first start with an extreme version of the Terducken. The Terducken is an extreme Thanksgiving dish, “consisting of a partially de-boned turkey stuffed with a de-boned duck, which itself is stuffed with a small de-boned chicken”. Anne Petch, of Heal Farm in Kings Nympton, UK took this a few steps further, making a mind-boggling twelve bird variant of this; “turkey on the outside, goose, chicken, pheasant, three ducks, poussin, guinea fowl, partridge, pigeon squab and quail.”

The next bite of awesomeness comes from the awesome folks at Evil Mad Scientist, who created Fractal cookies:

Our final bit of awesomeness is… The Fractal Pizza!:

The fractal pizza is made by first making a bunch of small, itty bitty sized pizzas. These are then used as the topping for a larger set of pizzas. These pizzas are then used as the topping for the final big pizza, the recursive monster pictured above.

So, what fractal food can you think up?

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conan o' brien is crazy

He brought in MIT professor Peter Fischer to perfect his ring spinning on TV:

You can skip to 5 minutes into this clip for the actual ring spinning. I left in the initial bit to demonstrate HOW MUCH TIME it takes for PhD folks to talk about what they do for a living.

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thank you professor hearst

I'm alive. depressed, tired, vanquished, helpless, just plain frustrated with life, but alive. Just thought I'd let people know.

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DrumNet

Proof that some people will do anything for extra credit:

At Algoma University the mature students in the fast track accelerated second degree program are not quick to accept theory without proof. As a result, Professor George Townsend offered extra credit to anyone in his forth year Computer Networks course who could take up the challenge of implementing internet based protocols over a new form of medium - Bongo Drums.

Eight weeks later, the first public demonstration was given to the class by using a simple ping packet. With a blinding 2bps speed, the class sat patiently as the packet was received in roughly 140 seconds.

tughlaqabad

Went for the walk at Tughlaqabad fort today. Magsasay award winner Dr. Ramji Narayan took us to the fort, and told us all about it. Dr. Ramji is an economics professor, but it's amazing that he knows so much about history. The fort is an amazing 14th century monument, and it was really cool to learn about how people built buildings for war in the pre-gunpowder era. We even had a chance to go down into one of the Sultan's escape passages, which was all dark and full of bats. It was a nice mix of adventure and education. And the phrase for the day would be Dr. Ramji's now famous qu

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