electricity

Nerds are the new Rock Stars

We’re seeing a new breed of rock stars these days: Scientists.

Apparently there is a Night Club for Nerdy People in the Big Apple :

The crowd is young and hip, mostly in their 20s and 30s, eager to gain entry to tonight’s hot-ticket entertainment event. Once the doors open, about 50 lucky people secure chairs, while another 50 stand four-deep around the room, and another 50 are gently turned away at the door.
“This is the third time I haven’t made it in,” a disappointed young woman sighs.
A mixtape of music plays through the speakers and the audience sips drinks from plastic cups while waiting for the featured act to begin. It won’t be the latest indie band, or an up-and-coming comedian. This is not the typical New York club scene. This is the monthly meeting of the Secret Science Club.

Then there’s DorkBot, which has branches everywhere:

the main goals of dorkbot are: to create an informal, friendly environment in which people can talk, […] to give us all an opportunity to see the strange things our neighbors are doing with electricity.

Meanwhile, in Cambridge, Massachusetts, “Dr. Evil” and the “Mexican Multiplier” have dueled it out till the very end, in an attempt to write the largest number on a chalkboard.

Finally, here’s an awesome ad from Intel’s amazing marketing team:

startup idea #4984

Here’s an idea I thought of a while ago. You have the storm botnet, which is apparently now capable of being the world’s most powerful supercomputer:

The Storm botnet, or Storm worm botnet, is a massive network of computers linked by the Storm worm Trojan horse in a botnet, a group of “zombie” computers controlled remotely. It is estimated to run on as many as 1,000,000 to 50,000,000 infected and compromised computer systems as of September 2007. Its formation began around January, 2007, when the Storm worm at one point accounted for 8% of all infections on all Microsoft Windows computers.

The botnet reportedly is powerful enough as of September 2007 to force entire countries off of the Internet, and is estimated to be able to potentially execute more instructions per second than some of the world’s top supercomputers.

Obviously, having a large supercomputer is big business these days. So what you do is have a legal version of this. Let’s say you sell computers at 70% of their real price. The only catch is that people will have to run this special software as part of the system. The special software is basically a remote compute client similar to Folding@Home or Google Compute.

Once you have sold enough computers, you essentially have a large army of computers at your beck and call, for 30% the price of what you would have to invest in otherwise. Of course, obviously someone else owns the machines, but while they are doing lightweight tasks such as checking email and chatting, you are folding proteins, running simulations and cracking ciphers.

Now here’s the best part of the deal: the most expensive part of a grid is not the hardware, but the electricity that it uses. And guess who’s paying this electricity! The customer, not you!.

So there you have it. A cheap, one-time cost for an everlasting free CPU grid. Awesome ainnit?

note: This idea is under this license.

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live from mumbai

Greetings from the city that never sleeps! To compensate for the non correspondence from Jamshedpur, the most well planned town in India, I shall now write about my stay in Jamshedpur, a.k.a. Tatanagar. The town is named after the great Jamshedji Tata, founder of the Tata Empire, one of the largest corporate empires in India. It was founded many, many years ago by the Tatas to support their iron and steel mining operations, and is a true marvel in town planning. I find it incredible that a single corporation takes care of everything in the city - the roads, electricity, and all other facilities are handled by Tata.