Technology

atomic requirement

Dear everyone who's using a Blogger.com / Blog*spot account:, I have a small favour to ask of you: Why not get an Atom feed for your website? It allows us aggregator-using people to subscribe to your blog and read them when it's updated. You guys are the only one without feeds (even Livejournal folks have feeds) so I think it's a good idea to enable them. Here's how you can do it.

|

gee, mail!!

First of all, a million namastes to Kiruba. He sent me one of his two gmail invites, so if you want to send me 500 emails each containing boring photographs of your last holiday trip, you can now do that to this address: arnabdotorg at the service in question. First opinions: fast, but mostly because a) the internet is built nowadays to provide google faster and b) there are no rich media ads, as compared to HottMale and Yeahwho. Apart from that, just some new UI thingies - it might change the way I see my mail, but not how I use it. B

| |

i'm alive

Well, I've been meaning to write this entry for ages now, but I guess the procrastination glands have been working overtime lately.

Frequent visitors of this weblog might have noticed the "Live From Mumbai" sign removed from the headers on the 15th of this month - that was the day I came back to Delhi, after 3 and a half long months away from home. I travelled by the new Rajdhani Express, which looks spectacularly awesome in terms of exterior train design. The interior hasn't changed much, though. I was disappointed that the notable updates to the interior were restricted to larger windows and airplane-like toilet facilities. I'm sure there was a lot more they could have done with the design. Of course, when they serve you Kaju Kishmish icecream for dessert after dinner, it's a little hard to complain about the overall experience, so I'll give it a thumbs up anyway.

| |

yahoo vs google

Yahoo dumps Google. They're powered by their own search engine now, thanks to the acquisitions the made last year. It's amusing to see how the browser wars have turned out. In the very beginning, we had the following players:

Altavista - One time leader in the websearch engine. Commited harakiri by tranforming into a portal, among other things.
AllTheWeb - Indexes a LOT of pages. I used it for pages I couldn't find anywhere else. But that's about all I used it for.
Yahoo - Search, mostly dependent on the then-huge human-managed directory. Plus points: search quality, and portal features.

travelogue I

Thanks to the fog in northern india, it's virtually impossible to drive almost anything anywhere. Visibility at dawn is next to zero - we had to follow blinking lights of autorikshas on our way to the station. And then there's the train which arrived here 9 hours late. Oh, by the way, I'm here in Kolkata - reached safe and sound, albeit tired and trainsick. Supposedly, the last few days are the coldest Kolkata's seen in years, but it seems like spring to me, compared to the winter in Delhi. I guess I'm travelling on a cold wave.

| |

does not use overseas labor

After seeing the WayPath project, I was beginning to like ThinkTank23 as a company. It even had a "community" link and all. Just then, I read the ending lines of their about page:

Think Tank 23 is a privately-held company with service centers in Seattle, Washington, and Denver, Colorado, and a network of U.S. based resources across the country. Think Tank does not use overseas labor.

"does not use overseas labor" - Perhaps I'm being too sensitive, but I didn't like the apparent tone of the phrase. Are they trying to imply that "overseas labor" is something lowly and inferior (the term "labor" being used for software development being a whole different matter), and that their company is superior by not using it? Perhaps not. Perhaps all they're saying is that they're doing their bit for the United States by keeping American jobs in America, and hence appealing to the prospective local clients who would prefer all-American companies.

what will they think of next

Today's "l337" thing to do: bluejacking. From the website bluejackq.com:

...using a phone with Bluetooth, you can create a phonebook contact and write a message, eg. 'Hello, you've been bluejacked', in the 'Name' field. Then you can search for other phones with Bluetooth and send that phonebook contact to them. On their phone, a message will popup saying "'Hello, you've been bluejacked' has just been received by Bluetooth" or something along those lines. For most 'victims' they will have no idea as to

| |

neat

Break Up Letter Generator: Hmm, this should be useful someday.

update: a wonderful reader pointed out that the link is dead. As a public service, here are some more websites you can use to to say goodbye.

|

brand new day?

Microsoft seems to be flaunting a new attitude, one that says "Yes we're evil. Now let us try to become good". Rob Scoble is almost 100% of the time using this as his basic evangelistic premise; new language technologies ASP and .Net support unix-friendly PerlScript; and the open-source-like pre-pre-pre-alpha release of Longhorn is full of this apparently positive approach.

| |

lost in transit

As an added 'feature' to its services, my internet provider intercepts all outgoing emails and sends them using its own mail server. While this is quite helpful since I can send large attachments very quickly; the problem is that this is done through an open relay. It seems that the server was recently detected and blacklisted by spam tracking lists, making spam filters think my email is spam. I've stopped using the local relay server for now, but it seems lots of people haven't received emails that I sent out.

| |